How To Talk About A Birthing Centre

How many of you have visited birthing centre?

A birthing centre is an institution comprised typically of nurse, midwives, doctors etc. It is a healthcare facility that provides intensive one-on-one care to mothers in labour, and emotional support through the services of doulas. Using birthing centres can give you a more homely and supportive environment while giving birth, as opposed to the austerity and strict protocol of a hospital.

If you’ve used a birthing clinic, we’re sure you can attest to the above. . We’re also sure that anyone who has used a birthing clinic would love to spread the word to all prospective moms out there, including you!

Sometimes though, we all face problems when trying to accurately convey exactly what we’re trying to say.

Read on to learn exactly what to say, to make your conversational partner understand the ins and outs of a birthing clinic. Happy learning!

So, let’s start by taking a basic situation that all of us can relate to, and work from there.

*Your sister is pregnant and wondering if she should use a hospital or a birthing centre to assist with the birth. You want to advise her to use a birthing clinic.*

Read on to find the overall flow, specific vocabulary, phrases, and expressions that can be used for an effective and fluent conversation on this topic. Right below is your guide to having an engaging conversation!

A conversation has specific phases that it goes through. Here is a quick look at we will teach you, to guarantee you a smooth conversation.   

 Content : What is it that you are going to talk about?

Use the ‘wh’ questions along with the keywords to help you put together the content.

  1. Who works at a birthing clinic? – Qualified professionals such as nurses and doctors as well as midwives, doulas etc.
  2. What are the benefits provided? – Individual subjective care, Relaxed Environment, Emotional Support etc.
  3. How is a birthing centre different from a hospital maternity ward? – Amenities, Private Rooms, Kitchens for private use, Comfort Measures (Massages, Hydrotherapy) etc.
  4. Who can use a birthing centre? – Women with no significant complications in their medical history, Low-risk pregnancies etc.
  5. Who cannot use a birthing centre? – Women older than 35, Women with breech-positioned babies etc.

Choosing Contextual Vocabulary

Choosing contextual vocabulary to suit the scenario you’re talking about can be very important when it comes to giving depth and clarity to what you’re trying to say, as well as piquing your partner’s attention. In this case, you’re talking about birthing centres.

Listed below are a few words and phrases that could come in handy while elaborating on the topic.

  1. Anesthesia
  2. Parenting
  3. Family-centred care
  4. Nurses
  5. Midwife
  6. Complications
  7. Birth
  8. Medicine
  9. Labor
  10. Doctors
  11. Health
  12. Babies
  13. Prenatal Care
  14. Postnatal Care
  15. Amenities/Facilities

Similarly. given below are a few descriptive words and phrases that you could use to make your conversation more interesting!

  1. Post-pregnancy problems
  2. Difficult pregnancies
  3. Sufficient mental health care
  4. Effective post-natal care.
  5. Significant complications
  6. Minimal medical intervention
  7. Continuous fetal monitoring
  8. Healthcare provider
  9. Accredited birth center
  10. Natural birth
  11. Familial and Peer support
  12. Insurance coverage
  13. Working medical equipment
  14. Comfort measures
  15. Professional Consultants

Initiate the conversation by enquiring about the pregnancy.

I heard the good news, is it true? Congratulations on your pregnancy!

Ask if your conversational partner requires assistance concerning where to deliver the baby.

Do you need any help with deciding the place of delivery? I had to go through it when my son Adarsh was born, so I’m pretty well-versed with the procedure.

Tell your partner why you think she should/shouldn’t use a birthing centre

  1. Using birthing centres isn’t conducive for people over 35, so I don’t think it’d be safe for you to use one.
  2. You don’t have any complications in your medical history right? A birthing centre would be much more relaxing and stress-free for you.
  3. Birthing centres offer a lot of facilities for giving birth like hydrotherapy, massages, cold compresses etc. I found it a good experience, especially with the pain of giving birth.
  4. Since your baby is in breech position, I don’t think you can use a birthing clinic. You’ll need intensive doctoral care to deal with that.
  5. I would’ve recommended a good birthing centre to you, but you have high blood pressure right? I don’t think using a birthing centre would be suitable for you in that case.

End by telling your friend to ask you for anything if she has questions

‘Please don’t hesitate to ask me for help if you need anything’

A model answer would be as follows.

I heard the good news, is it true? Congratulations on your pregnancy! Do you need any help with deciding the place of delivery? I had to go through it when my son Adarsh was born, so I’m pretty well-versed with the procedure. Birthing centres offer a lot of facilities for giving birth like hydrotherapy, massages, cold compresses etc. I found it a good experience, especially with the pain of giving birth. You don’t have any complications in your medical history right? A birthing centre would be much more relaxing and stress-free for you. I definitely think you should consider using one for your delivery.

Karen Niroshana

Author Karen Niroshana

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